Creative Writing Prompts and How To Use Them

Sometimes, the words just don’t flow.

Writer’s block is something that unfortunately every single writer will come across in their writing career. In the past, I’ve written about ways to overcome writer’s block, touching on a few different techniques I’ve used to help jolt the creativity in my system. You can find those here, here, and here. I have another suggestion for you all… and I honestly can’t believe I’ve never thought to share it before.

Writing prompts are a great way to get your mind going and in the mood for writing. Sometimes (and this has actually happened to me before) it can even be the beginning of a whole new project.

There are many different places you can go to if you’re looking for writing prompts. Of course, Googling it is a solid approach. From there, you’ll find dozens of websites with hundreds of prompts out there for your perusal. I personally find the Writer’s Digest writing prompt webpage helpful, as well as ThinkWritten’s prompt page, found here. Both of these sites provide broad ideas to help push through that tough bout of writer’s block and get writing again.

Pinterest is also a super helpful site when it comes to searching for writing prompts. Just type those key words into the search bar and you’ll find tons of stuff to release your creativity. Through Pinterest, both dialogue prompts and general prompts will appear in your search. Dialogue prompts are great – they give you a (usually) single sentence a character would say, and then you have to go with it from there, making the piece your own. Sometimes, these dialogue prompts can be a couple of lines, even a small amount of banter between two characters. I personally find dialogue prompts extremely helpful, as they can get the brain firing with all creative cylinders again. They even can help out with current projects you’re working on – sometimes the dialogue provided for you sounds exactly like something one of your characters would say and that’s all you really need to get going again.

Now that you’ve found a writing prompt that you like, what do you do with it?

Like I mentioned before, writing prompts can turn into their own piece of work. Short story, full-length novel, poem, script… the sky is the limit. The thing about prompts is that they’re there to spark the creativity which has become stagnant in your brain. Sometimes that’s all they’re good for, and once you’ve harnessed that creativity again, you don’t need the prompt anymore. But sometimes that prompt turns into something much, much more. And I personally think that’s when things get really interesting. All of a sudden you’ve got a new project on your hands. New characters, a new setting, new conflicts that need to be resolved. Isn’t that what every writer looks forward to? Working on a new piece?

So there you have it: writing prompts. Another way to help keep the creativity flowing or get it jump-started again. I hope this suggestion is useful for your writing. As always, if you have any other websites you use for writing prompts, or have any other suggestions on the subject, please feel free to put it in the comments section below.

Keep writing everyone!

Until next time.

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How I Stay Creative

Being a writer is a difficult occupation. Finding work – a struggle. Making ends meet – even more so. Coming up with idea after idea – depending on who you talk to, this task may actually be the most difficult. For some reason, creativity can be a real issue for a lot of writers. It’s not that the ideas aren’t always there – most of the time they are. It’s just that the process from which the ideas go from the head down onto the piece of paper or word document doesn’t always translate very well.

Over the years that I’ve been writing, I’ve found there are certain things which hinder my creativity, and help it too. For your assistance, I’ve decided to compile a short list of a couple things I do which can sometimes make the creative process a little easier.

  1. Go for walks. For some reason, I’ve always felt that nature tends to relax the mind and body and allow for the creative juices to get flowing again. Maybe it’s the calmness of leaves blowing in the breeze, or maybe it’s because you’re escaping from civilization for even just a short little while. But whatever the reason, nature walks (or even just going to a park and sitting someplace quiet) tends to help rejuvenate any sort of creative thoughts I’ve been stuck on.
  2. Take public transportation. Sometimes I need to unwind from a busy day – or a frustrating writer’s block session. If I’m going somewhere, public transportation can help give me time to think. That’s the problem I find with driving. The little times I actually do use a car, I find my brain has to focus so hard on the actual driving (which it should be doing) that I can’t think about anything else, writing included. When you’re on a bus or a train, you don’t have to focus on traffic – you can just focus on the task at hand (writing) and forget about everything else.
  3. Listen to music. Like I’ve mentioned before, I have a writing playlist (or writing song) which instantly gets me in the mood for some solid writing time. Try doing this for yourself. Music has a wonderful way of helping your brain clear out day-to-day thoughts and issues and let you forget about them. It’s yet another way to refocus your mind on the writing you should be doing.
  4. Go people-watching. I know, this one might sound a little weird at first, but honestly it totally helps out with the writer’s block. Go to a public place: the mall, the park, the local university. From there, do nothing but observe. You’d be amazed what you might see which will spark your creativity. For me, I know I’ve watched someone do something, or react in a particular way that I found interesting, and that’s ended up working its way into one of my novels. People-watching is a great way to work on character and plot development. You can always count on people to do crazy things that are novel-worthy.

So there’s a few suggestions to help keep the creativity flowing. I hope some of these ideas will help you all out with your writing endeavours. If you have anything else that works for you, please comment below. I’m always up for learning new ways to keep the words flowing onto the page! Keep writing everyone!

Until next time.